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Rainy and Warm Start to August

Reminiscent of the start of July, the first half of this month has brought warmer-than-normal temperatures to the Northeast, making it truly feel like summer. Each of the major climate sites in the Northeast had a warmer-than-normal start to August. All but six of the 35 major climate sites ranked the beginning of August among their twenty warmest on record, and 16 of those areas had among their ten warmest on record. Atlantic City, NJ, with an average temperature departure of 6˚F above normal, had a record-warm start to the month.

Temp map

Particularly in the northern part of the region, temperatures have been above normal during the first half of August.

Temp chart

All of the 35 major climate sites in the Northeast experienced a warmer-than-normal start to August.

August has been off to a rainy start for much of the Northeast. The first half of August has been the wettest on record for five climate sites, and the beginning of the month ranked among the 20 wettest on record for 19 of the 35 major climate sites in the region. Concord, NH has received 8.48 inches of rain so far this month, which is over five times the normal amount for that area. Many locations in the Northeast have been wetter than normal during the first half of the month, but seven climate sites scattered throughout the region have received less precipitation than normal. Burlington, VT recorded 62% of its normal precipitation after receiving only 1.25 inches of rain so far this month.

Precip chart

The beginning of August was the wettest on record for five of the major climate sites in the region.

Significant flooding was reported throughout the central part of the region when areas near coastal New Jersey, Pennsylvania and central New York experienced localized flash flooding as a result of heavy downpours during the middle of the month. Over 100 homes were evacuated in Brick, NJ beginning on August 13th, and road closures were reported along coastal New Jersey and in Seneca County, NY that same week as rivers started to overflow their banks, prompting a state of emergency to be issued in many of those areas.

Precip map

Heavy rain led to flooding in the central part of the Northeast, while other areas have remained drier-than-normal.